Event Agenda

16.06.2021

(16 Jun 2021 | Wednesday)

17.06.2021

(17 Jun 2021 | Thursday)

18.06.2021

(18 Jun 2021 | Friday)

  • Main Stage
  • 09:30 - 10:00
    Official opening of the conference (ICC Team)
    Agata Wąsowska-Pawlik
  • 10:00 - 11:00
    Key-note lecture: Putting cultural heritage at the heart of the European Green Deal (Europa Nostra)
    Sneška Quaedvlieg-Mihailović
    Tackling climate change is this generation’s defining task. Being a driver of positive change, Europe's cultural heritage can play an important role in addressing the climate emergency. For this reason, Europa Nostra in partnership with ICOMOS, and with the support of the European Investment Bank Institute, the involvement of the Climate Heritage Network and the input by members European Heritage Alliance, recently launched the European Cultural Heritage Green Paper “Putting Europe’s shared heritage at the heart of the European Green Deal”. The paper is a timely policy and advocacy document that correlates the contribution of cultural heritage to all main key areas of the European Green Deal. It is also relevant for the New European Bauhaus initiative, launched by the European Commission, of which Europa Nostra is among the proud partners. The paper also proposes a series of concrete recommendations both for policy-makers and for cultural heritage stakeholders. Moreover, the paper identifies potential conflicts, real or perceived, between heritage safeguarding and European Green Deal action, as well as win-win strategies for overcoming these conflicts. Europa Nostra (The European Voice of Civil Society Committed to Cultural Heritage) and all partners involved in the project are convinced that the European Green Deal needs cultural heritage to succeed, and vice versa: Cultural Heritage is a key actor for Europe’s green recovery. Targeted, coordinated and multi-sectoral civil society actions are fundamental for a wider mobilisation of the heritage community for a better, effective and sustainable change in Europe and beyond.
  • 11:30 - 13:00
    The future of mega-events in historic cities. How to organise them using and safeguarding cultural heritage at the same time? Results of the HOMEE project
    Franco Bianchini, Kathrin Deventer, Piotr Knaś, Anna Kozioł, Davide Ponzini, Jacek Purchla, Joanna Sanetra-Szeliga, Julia Nerantzia TZORTZI (GEORGI), Hubert Mącik
    Cultural mega-events, European Capitals of Culture but not only, have been undergoing a significant evolution over the last thirty years or so. They are no longer perceived as just cultural festivities that broaden cultural offer of the host city. Aware of their socio-economic impact cities use them to boost their own development. However, for historic cities this may mean both an opportunity for development but also a threat to their cultural tangible and intangible heritage. Recommendations of the Charter for Mega-Events in Heritage-Rich Cities, the final out of the HOMEE project, are a useful tool that helps cities take advantage of the opportunities offered by large events and mitigate the risks for cultural heritage. The aim of the session is to present the Charter, based on a literature research and extensive case studies, with the conclusions validated by experts in the field through a series of workshops, and trigger a discussion on challenges faced by historic cities organising large and mega events. While it is true that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative effect on the event industry, this time can also be used as an opportunity to re-think the way events, especially mega-events, operate, using the Charter to develop new event strategies in heritage-rich cities. HOMEE (Heritage Opportunities/Threats Within Mega-Events in Europe Changing Environments, New Challenges and Possible Solutions for Preservation in Mega-Events Embedded in Heritage-Rich European Cities) is a three year international research project that aims to better understand the relationship between mega-events and cultural heritage protection policy, as well as the impact of mega-events on heritage-rich cities in Europe. Research partners include Politecnico di Milano (coordinator) (Italy), University of Hull (the UK), Neapolis University Pafos (Cyprus) and the International Cultural Centre (Poland). The project is financed by JPICH Heritage in Changing Environments Programme – support for research on cultural heritage within Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage. More about the project: https://mck.krakow.pl/homee-about-the-project
  • 13:30 - 15:30
    Heritage Sustainability, Resilience, and the 2030 Agenda
    Pamela Durán Díaz, Cornelius Holtorf, Jordi Morató, Rubén Pesci, Ege Yildirim
    The UNESCO World Heritage Convention provides leadership in celebrating and safeguarding the cultural and natural heritage of the world, not only the Outstanding Universal Value of the 1.000+ sites on the World Heritage List, but all heritage valued by local communities. Based on UNESCO’s strategic objectives of Conservation, Credibility, Capacity-Building, Communities and Communication, heritage protection can be a medium to achieve our transformation into more locally empowered, just and resilient societies, based on the principles of People, Planet, Prosperity, Peace and Partnerships underpinning the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. However, this potential contribution is largely under-utilized, and depends on sustaining a mutually beneficial and progressive relationship between heritage and development processes, often not understood and harnessed effectively. This session will explore new approaches in heritage management and governance, to challenge traditional setbacks in heritage thinking and to support the development of a more positive relationship between heritage and development, urgently needed in the face of our unprecedented global challenges. This session is hosted by the International Cultural Centre in Kraków, as part of the 6th Heritage Forum of Central Europe focusing on the theme ‘Heritage & Development’ and co-organized with the OWH Sustainability Thematic Debate Team. In this session, in the form of a Round Table, themes convergent to the main theme of Heritage Sustainability will be addressed, such as: resilience, evolution, conservation, landscape and future of heritage. It is suggested that in addition to the conceptual and methodological framework, the speakers briefly present a case that exemplifies their experience in this line.
  • Parallel sessions
  • 15:50 - 16:10
    URBAN RENEWAL
    Heritage and sustainable urban development – Croatian case studies
    Nataša Urošević
    The paper will describe the current situation and development prospects in selected Croatian historic cities, and reflect on innovative models of urban regeneration and social revitalization a challenging global context, applying the concept of cultural economy, or the economics of uniqueness, which combines sustainable urban development with strategic mobilization of unique local cultural resources. The cities profiled as case studies are Pula, Poreč, Rijeka, and Šibenik, which are characterized by their transition from the previous military and industrial urban model of functioning to cultural tourism destinations. Besides drawing attention to key challenges faced by Croatian historic cities with UNESCO World Heritage or European Capital of Culture titles, the paper will reflect on the multidimensional role of cultural heritage in promoting key values of European identity, such as democracy, tolerance, solidarity, diversity, peace, and intercultural dialogue. It will also discuss the possibility of measuring the impact of cultural heritage on sustainable urban development using UNESCO Culture for Development Indicators (CDIS) and other cultural statistics available for the local and national level.
  • 15:50 - 16:10
    POST-GROWTH
    Sustainable tourism in the salt mine in Wieliczka – threats and opportunities
    Kinga Stabrawa-Powęska
    The dynamic development of tourism has created a dilemma: how to use heritage responsibly while minimizing the potentially negative effects of its exploitation. Can the answer be found in the concept of sustainable tourism? This assumes minimization of the negative impact of tourism on the natural environment and local culture, while creating opportunities for the development of the region. One site that can serve as a case in point for many aspects of this issue is the salt mine in Wieliczka, one of the most popular places on the tourist map of Poland. Still a living site of mining heritage, it is also a huge source of tourism resources, especially in terms of local development. At the same time, however, it is an example of how tourism can also present a serious threat. This presentation will use selected examples to show whether and how certain problems have been solved and whether sustainable tourism is an answer to today’s challenges.
  • 15:50 - 16:10
    RESILIENCE
    Yenikapı Rescue Excavations: Heritage vs. Politics
    Levent Tökün
    This paper examines the Yenikapı Rescue Excavations (Yenikapı Excavations) in Istanbul, Turkey—launched as part of the Marmaray metro link project—in order to demonstrate how a country’s day-to-day politics (in this case Turkey’s) can affect its heritage. This outstanding 21st-century discovery transformed both the history of the city as well as history itself. Throughout the project, the government and the municipality often took conflicting and controversial actions and changed their interpretations of the rich and unexpected heritage uncovered by the archaeologists. To illustrate this heritage vs. politics dichotomy, the paper explores many aspects of the project: a brief description of its progress and findings is followed by an assessment of its historical significance and world heritage status, its political aspects, its current state, and prospects for the site. Even though the Marmaray line was opened to the public years ago and most of the excavations have been officially closed, there is still much all stakeholders, including international bodies such as UNESCO, must do to protect and enrich the city’s cultural life and natural resources, especially regarding its World Heritage status.
  • 15:50 - 16:10
    SOCIAL INTEGRITY
    “BUILDING PEACE through HERITAGE” APPEAL 2021 by “Life Beyond Tourism-Travel to Dialogue” Movement
    Paolo Del Bianco
    By LBT: WHS take on the responsibility of "Awareness Centers” to widespread a new sensitivity and a consequent new cultural and commercial offer with different ethic. WHS’ management not only protects and enhances the heritage, but favors the 'International Community' encouraging the world-wide exercise of intercultural dialogue between visitors in the same place, same time, same aptitude to listening, promoting a virtuosos synergy between the UNESCO Conventions 1972, 2003, 2005 WHS could experiment the post-pandemic reverse of the hitherto prevalent degrade of the travel experience. This new cultural and commercial offer relies upon world scale 'knowledge initiatives', transforming the hasty tourist into a ‘Temporary Resident’ induced to a deep knowledge of the place, its wonders, culture, traditions, thus favoring friendship, mutual respect and peace.
  • Parallel sessions
  • 16:10 - 16:30
    URBAN RENEWAL
    Upper Silesian post-industrial dilemmas and new perspectives
    Ewa Chojecka
    As the entire region faces rapid technological transformation, the majority of traditional heavy industry sites—coal mines, foundries, and power stations—have been proven economically inefficient and are gradually being decommissioned. Some have gained a ‘second life’ as commemorative monuments with a role in promoting and preserving industrial heritage and local tradition on the basis of one of several models: 1. As tourist attractions offering the ‘almost tangible’ experience of a ‘real’ mine (Tarnowskie Góry’s UNESCO World Heritage-listed Silver Mine and Black Trout Adit, Zabrze’s Guido Coal Mine). 2. Commemoration of the dramatic miners’ protest of 16 Dec. 1981 (Wujek Coal Mine, Katowice, in the adjacent museum). 3. Development of three post-modernist facilities on the site of the former Ferdinand/Katowice Coal Mine: the Silesian Museum, the International Congress Centre, and the Silesian Philharmonic Concert Hall, as a threefold commemorative accent. The post-industrial sphere has thus gained new layers and shades of meaning.
  • 16:10 - 16:30
    POST-GROWTH
    Big Data in the service of sustainable tourism
    Aleksandra Ćwik
    Digitalization is the use of digital technologies in nearly all aspects of our daily lives, including public and cultural services. Big Data, defined as ‘the ability of society to harness information in novel ways to produce useful insights or goods and services of significant value’, has opened up a new field of knowledge acquisition. It has produced accurate forecasts or critical revisions of former conclusions when coupled with other disciplines. Heritage studies is becoming increasingly relevant in the discourse on sustainable development. Sustainable tourism is an industry niche that encompasses digitalization and cultural heritage. This presentation will summarize the opportunities and threats around Big Data and its implementations, and offer a brief explanation of data sources and data refining in the context of heritage and sustainable development, and the applicability of these methods for studying tourist traffic and shifting the public interest toward more responsible tourism practices.
  • 16:10 - 16:30
    RESILIENCE
    Building resilience through a programme Renewal of castles in Slovakia
    Alexandra Bitušíková
    The paper looks at a decade-long programme for the renewal of castles in Slovak cities and villages with the involvement of unemployed people. The programme was launched in June 2011 by the Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs, and Family and the Ministry of Culture to give jobless people the opportunity to learn new skills, and at the same time to contribute to the renovation of numerous castles that were in critical condition. It is one of a number of examples of successful use of European funding in Slovakia. The two ministries behind the programme built up active collaboration with municipalities and numerous civil society organizations engaged in cultural heritage preservation. Two main benefits have been achieved: 1. Hundreds of unemployed people have acquired new skills, which has helped them to find new long-term jobs; 2. The renovated castles have become cultural tourism destinations that have created new jobs in the region. The programme has helped to build social and cultural resilience in all the localities involved by empowering local unemployed people, contributing to local development, raising awareness of local identity, and building solidarity as a basis for collaboration. The paper will be based on theories of social resilience and sustainability.
  • 16:10 - 16:30
    SOCIAL INTEGRITY
    Bottom-up culture in post-industrial towns as a new way of connecting between the past and the future
    Justyna Marcinkowska
    Włocławek is a medium-sized town undergoing deindustrialization and revitalization. Unemployment, emigration, and peripheralization are major problems, as is industrial heritage. The presentation will profile a new way of changing the town adopted by local activists in organizing cultural and historical events in public spaces (historical walks, town games, etc.). This involves building new connections between peripheral and central areas, using industrial heritage as the most important cultural capital, and adapting modernization methods and conveying knowledge and cultural models from metropolises to their town. The paper looks at how these activists attempt to influence thinking about industrial heritage in their organization of events, and how these cultural models interact with local identities and expectations. The case study of Włocławek highlights the problems faced by many post-industrial medium-sized towns in Central and Eastern Europe, and the identity problems of local elites working to mediate between globalized and local cultural models.
  • Parallel sessions
  • 16:30 - 16:50
    URBAN RENEWAL
    Fostering sustainable development through industrial heritage tourism? The case of “Steirische Eisenstraße” (Austria)
    Joern Harfst, Jasmin Sandriester
    In recent years, heritage has become an essential element of strategy in EU place-based policies, especially under the mantle of Europeanization (see Council of Europe 2005). Valorization of heritage through tourism is no new concept, but the focus recently seems to have shifted towards intangible assets (see Petronela 2016), thereby releasing new opportunities and prospects. Industrial heritage is a category apart in this context, as it still suffers from a 'dirty', negative image, which influences both potential tourists and inhabitants. On the basis of qualitative analysis, this contribution will discuss the importance of industrial heritage for sustainable regional development. It will highlight especially its social value as a medium for bolstering regional identity and appreciation for local cultural heritage, which benefits social cohesion.
  • 16:30 - 16:50
    POST-GROWTH
    Mapping the Economic Impacts of Material Cultural Heritage
    Anna Tuhárska
    The proposed paper sets out to showcase the objectives, methods, and outcomes of the transnational project ‘Material Cultural Heritage as a Strategic Territorial Development Resource: Mapping Impacts Through a Set of Common European Socio-economic Indicators’ which was conducted by the EHHF Taskforce on Economy and Statistics and supported financially and methodologically by the ESPON agency. The project attempted to quantify the impact of material cultural heritage on territorial and economic development in 11 European countries and regions, to provide a theoretical framework for this quantification, and to demonstrate by gathering relevant empirical evidence that the existence, conservation, and presentation of material cultural heritage can produce economic benefits in both tourism and many other sectors of the economy. The project also incorporated the development of a plan for a common monitoring system facilitating regular gathering and storage of data on selected socio-economic indicators to support informed policymaking.
  • 16:30 - 16:50
    SOCIAL INTEGRITY
    Through “familiar” Monuments of the Controversial Era to the Fundamental Cultural Heritage of the State and the Unity of Society
    Serhii Diachenko
    The issue of ‘social sustainability’ is specific to Ukraine. Attitudes towards cultural heritage in Western Europe and Eastern Europe are completely different, due to the historical development of the statehood of Eastern European countries in general, and the 70-year-old communist regime in particular, which imposed a view of historical heritage as unimportant in the socialist values paradigm. Today the civil society in Ukraine is polarized not only politically but also in terms of self-identification. The state imposed false guidelines for determining the nation’s identity, reducing the criteria to historical ethnography, and the material objects that contribute to this identity are all cultural heritage objects within the modern borders of Ukraine for the entire foreseeable historical period, up to recent years. This paper treats ‘Soviet modernism’ monuments as one such reference point for the formation of social integrity and changing attitudes towards historical memory.
  • 16:30 - 16:50
    RESILENCE
    New craftsmanship as a way of developing intangible heritage
    Lubomira Trojan
    Craftsmanship is an important element of intangible cultural heritage. Crafts can be used to build the product mix of local enterprises, create jobs, and develop tourism. Recent years have shown a strong and developing ‘new craftsmanship’ trend, which is becoming a factor in local development of significance for the economy and identity of local communities. The pandemic situation has shown that ‘new craftspeople’ can respond flexibly to crisis, and employ new sales and promotion models, which has a positive impact on heritage development. Zamek Cieszyn cooperates closely with new craftspeople. The article will profile the context of new craftsmanship in Poland and discuss the outcomes of workshops conducted at Zamek. The aim of these workshops was to find innovative ideas for the preservation and development of craftsmanship that are also applicable in the context of the pandemic. The results could produce new models for development of intangible heritage.
  • Parallel sessions
  • 16:50 - 17:10
    URBAN RENEWAL
    Moldovan-Polish Relations. A Case of Soroca Fortress
    Sergiu Musteață
    Relations between Moldova and Poland have a long history, whose trajectory is recorded in numerous written and archaeological sources. A special place within these relations is occupied by Soroca castle, which was part of the network of fortresses on the Dniester defending medieval Moldova’s eastern border. During the 15th and 16th centuries, Soroca often came under military attack from Cossack, Tatar, Turkish, and Polish forces. In 1538 the castle was taken by Ottoman forces, and in 1686–1699 was under Polish administration. Paradoxically, the castle survived all these attacks, thus being virtually the only medieval fortification that has survived intact to the present. This presentation will showcase the results of recent archaeological surveys (2012–2019). The Polish government is one of the actors involved in this rehabilitation project, which is a good example of community archaeology, one that has significantly impacted future conservation work and the development of cultural tourism in Soroca.
  • 16:50 - 17:10
    POST-GROWTH
    Social economy in the service of the integration of heritage with the present day. True or false?
    Łukasz Hajduk
    The social economy is not a new idea. In Poland we can trace its origins back to the Piast and Jagiellon dynasties. However, the most good practices are to be found in the 19th century. Today, the social economy allows us to combine modernity with tradition, business with charity, and above all, products and services with promotion of the local economy. This paper will focus on the Polish heritage of the social economy, drawing attention to the legacy of this tradition and to the continued effectiveness of mechanisms developed decades or even centuries ago. Unfortunately, people today do not always associate the social economy with good quality. That is why it is so important to rediscover this heritage and leverage it with modern working methods.
  • 16:50 - 17:10
    SOCIAL INTEGRITY
    Discrepancies in the practical implementation of the integrated approach to cultural heritage management of public or “our” local heritage
    Jasna Fakin Bajec
    The focus in the European Cultural Heritage Strategy for the 21st century is on an integrated approach to cultural heritage management, where involvement of local communities and the business sector in utilization of local heritage for community development has become a ubiquitous practice. Using the example of activities in one small village in Slovenia, its local heritage association Debela Griža, and the involvement of a private actor in the management of a prehistoric hillfort there, the presentation will discuss discrepancies between the theory and the practical implementation of this integrated approach. The main challenge that will be highlighted is the fact that the entrepreneur sees cultural heritage as an ‘inimitable market product’ and does not recognize the values important to local people and their voluntary work in preserving and promoting their local heritage. For this reason, involvement of local people in the development of tourism programmes and the archaeological conservation plan is limited. The paper therefore asks how public or ‘our’ local heritage can be managed in today’s neoliberal climate and how the cultural rights of the bearers of cultural practices can be safeguarded.
  • 16:50 - 17:10
    RESILIENCE
    Session Q&A
    Michał Wiśniewski
  • Parallel sessions
  • 17:10 - 18:10
    Online guided tour through the exhibition: More than Bauhaus. German photography between the wars and Polish parallels.
    "Golden 20s", dance, jazz, cabaret, but also unemployment and homelessness, hyperinflation, 2 great economic crises. Emancipation of women and voting rights for them. Waves of strikes and social unrest. How to reconcile these narratives about the 1920s? In the art of this period: the autonomy of photography, which becomes a full-fledged kind of art, new directions in thinking about photography, "New Objectivity", a new handy Leica camera, thanks to which everyone can take pictures everywhere. See our photo exhibition “ More than Bauhaus. German photography between the wars and Polish parallels”, which tells the story of German photography during the Weimar Republic, from the end of World War I to 1933, when Adolf Hitler took power. The inexhaustible wealth of objects, over 300 photographs, many threads showing the entire complexity of the 1920s. Natalia Żak, the exhibition curator, shows you around the exhibition.
  • 17:10 - 17:30
    POST-GROWTH
    Session Q&A
    Marek Świdrak
  • 17:10 - 17:30
    SOCIAL INTEGRITY
    Session Q&A
    Kamila Twardowska
  • 17:10 - 17:30
    URBAN RENEWAL
    Session Q&A
    Łukasz Galusek
  • Main Stage
  • 18:00 - 19:00
    Culture and Development
    lecture + Q&A
    Jerzy Hausner
    In my presentation I would like to consider whether it is possible to find a way out of the global megacrisis by turning towards culture. In practical terms, this orientation would be meant to lead to the reconstruction and opening up of the space that is public, communal, and autonomous with regard to what is private and individualized and to what is national, universal, and generalized. And, as a further consequence, this would lead to the emergence of social actors capable of triggering an institutional change that would create the framework for a new policy of development. Recently it is apparent how narrow and destructive it is to reduce culture to a particular type of economic activity, namely creative industries. Instead of narrow-mindedly reducing culture to a single part of the economy, we should look at the economy as a culture. Only then will we find a path leading from culture to development - both for individuals and the society at large. And only then will we correctly interpret the relationship between civilization and culture, recognizing that the economy, in order to develop and benefit the society, must be both civilization and culture. Therefore, questions about meaning and ethics must not be pushed out of its scope, leaving behind only the issue of efficiency.